EDITORIAL

Fears of Immigrants

It is ironical that illegal immigrants living in the United States should be in such mortal fear of eviction measures under the Trump administration. The irony is highlighted by the demographic composition of the United States—a country developed and sustained by hordes of immigrants from Europe to begin with, but from all over the world in later years. The openness of the American society and the opportunities it has thrown up for enterprising people to build the most remarkable futures over the opportunities available are the major attractions of the American society. So there are now 11 million immigrants living in the United States illegally, without worrying much about deportation. For most of them, deportation has existed mainly on paper. As long as one did not commit any serious crime, one could live and work in the country without fear and even send their children to school. The installation of Dold Trump as US President has changed all that. Two recent memos outlining the federal government’s plans to accelerate deportations have altered everything for the illegal migrants. Many immigrants have imposed house arrest on themselves by preferring not to go out. Some have stopped driving and going to shops and to church. Many illegal immigrants have stopped sending their children from going to school. The transition from a free society to a fearful one has been swift and traumatic for illegal migrants. However, there is really no room for complaints or protest, since the Trump administration is only doing what all responsible governments (unlike ours) ought to do.