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Why is Assam backward?

Why is Assam backward?

Sentinel Digital DeskBy : Sentinel Digital Desk

  |  5 March 2016 12:00 AM GMT

Why is Assam backward?

Why Assam backward is a moot question. Assam is backward because the Assamese people are backward. A section of the self-centered educated Assamese people is busy establishing themselves by hook or crook. The poor section of rural Assam is busy in finding ways for their survival. With almost 30% people of Assam being illiterate and most of the remaining educated 70% being mostly corrupt and self centered, development of Assam is not a priority in their mind. The only person in the history political Assam was our Lokopriya Gopith Bordoloi. He saved Assam from the clutch of Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru, Chi and of course, East Pakistan; Assam as a state would have disappeared from the face of the earth. It is because of his foresight for the future of Assam that we have the state of Assam, our own Gauhati University, the Gauhati High Court, the Assam Medical College and the Assam Veteriry College etc. Unfortutely for the people of Assam, his life ended prematurely before fulfilling whatever dream he had for the future of Assam. Our modern politicians, including the Chief Minister, are busy filling their pockets with billions of rupees meant for the poor. It is no wonder that Assam is backward. In the mid eighties a British Member of Parliament, while discussing, on the public radio, the motive of Indian, American and British Parliamentarian commented that while members of British parliament and to a great extent the members of the American Sete concern themselves with development of their constituency and the country, Indian MPs and MLAs make building up their persol bank accounts heir main concern. The condition of roads and bridges in Assam are still deplorable and there is no provision for running water and electricity supply is erratic or uvailable, there no provision for sanitation, children still walks for miles to go to schools, most of which have no drinking water, toilets, play grounds so vital for their health and development. In the future Smart City of Guwahati, there is no beautiful park and no beautiful riverfront for people to enjoy the beauty of ture (with the mighty Brahmaputra running by its side). In my opinion Assam will remain backward until we have honest and devoted leaders taking charge of the state. We must bring up our future generation with honesty, integrity and truthfulness. In our growing up days in our rural home in Jamugurihat, we were taught never to lie, never to cheat, steal, never to be selfish and to help the needy. In America, I taught the same principles to my two children and I am proud to say that they feel they are more honest than me. To make Assam great and prosperous, we must bring up honest, selfless children and only then Assam will never remain backward.

Mahendra Bhuyan, MD,

34 Lindbergh Place Terrace

Saint Louis, Missouri 63146, USA.

A Boon or Curse?

A saying in Hindi goes, ‘Kuch Paaneke liye Kuch Kho Parta Hai’, meaning to get something, one has to lose something. This is exactly what we experience, when we observe the alarming pollution level in the vicinity of BCPL, mainly Sessa and Borbaruah. Many at Borbaruah are of the opinion that with the functioning of the BCPL the sky above seems to wear an unusual look. Morning walk is a common sight nowadays everywhere. Borboruah, too, is no exception. People going for morning walks complain that they are welcome by a pungent odour mainly due to the flaring up of the fire in the BCPL. It is reported that in the Sessa areas, the impact of pollution is all pervasive. Some waste materials flowing to the Sessa, make the water polluted. People are scared to take fish of the Sessa River. Again, many people of the areas complain that white bed sheets kept in the sun for drying takes somewhat grey colour by the afternoon. People in the vicinity of BCPL also lament that more than 1000 trees have been hewed down for erecting the structures of the buildings of the project – resulting in a serious ecological imbalance. All that the BCPL authority is required to do is planting of more than 5000 saplings to maintain the balance, as suggested by some local people.

I appeal to the BCPL authority, the pollution Control board of Assam and the district administration to take appropriate steps to minimize the level of pollution.

Ashok Bordoloi,

Dibrugarh.

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