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Webinar organized on conservation of endangered species

The India Tourism in association with NE Focus organized a webinar on the preservation and conservation of rare and endangered species of the Northeast with special reference to the Hoolock Gibbon.

endangered species

Sentinel Digital DeskBy : Sentinel Digital Desk

  |  4 Aug 2021 2:30 AM GMT

GUWAHATI: The India Tourism in association with NE Focus organized a webinar on the preservation and conservation of rare and endangered species of the Northeast with special reference to the Hoolock Gibbon.

SS Devbarman gave the inaugural address wherein he talked of the faunal diversity of Assam and the Northeast. He talked of the Hoolock Gibbon and its characteristic traits.

Dr Amit Sahai talked about the steps taken by the government regarding the conservation of the Hoolock Gibbon and its geographical region. He also expressed his anticipation towards taking some more steps like making canopy bridges for the species, resolving issues related to the bifurcation of Hoolock Gibbon Wildlife Sanctuary by a railway track and other forests where these rare species are found.

Dr Narayan Sharma gave an elaborative presentation on ecology and conservation wherein he talked of the Hoolock Gibbon, its habits, traits and habitat beside the geographical regions where they are found. He highlighted some important points responsible for the species being rare viz. low fecundity, small geographical ranges, low niche breadth, poor dispersal ability and much-specialized diet. The importance of preservation and conservation of Hoolock Gibbon is also apprised by Dr Sharma.

Dr Dilip Chetry talked about the population distribution and extinction trend of Hoolock Gibbon in Assam and other parts of its habitation in and around the State. He enlightened on the conservation measures taken as Indo-US collaboration in the Hollongapar Gibbon Sanctuary phase-wise. He expressed his satisfaction about the success of the idea of a natural canopy that took more than 100 years to form and which helps the Hoolock Gibbons to move from one part of the Sanctuary to another. Demonstration of other relevant works like awareness campaigns and facilitating the increasing tourists and researchers and success stories of these has been done by Dr Chetry.

Participants had queries for the panellists and questions particularly about the dwindling numbers of Hoolock Gibbon in the Barekuri Forest Reserve and the steps taken by the government to resolve this issue. The webinar touched upon many issues related to Hoolock Gibbon and was quite an enlightening session, stated a release.

Also Read: Depleting Forests of Barak Valley Force Endangered Species to Escape

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