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Athletes React to Photos of 'Anti-Sex' Beds Allocated for Tokyo Olympics

Many even joked calling these beds as "anti-sex beds" signalling that the capacity of the beds are barely sufficient for a single person.

Athletes React to Photos of Anti-Sex Beds Allocated for Tokyo Olympics

Sentinel Digital Desk

TOKYO:

The beds assigned to athletes for the forthcoming Tokyo Olympics have been a major topic of discussion, as the size of the beds has proven to be comical for many competitors, who have swamped social media with posts about the beds.

The frame of the beds allocated to the Tokyo Games athletes have been made of recyclable cardboard, with mattresses made of polyethylene materials that will be repurposed to manufacture plastic items after the Games, according to organisers.

During the Olympics, which begin on July 24, up to 18,000 beds will be needed in the village, which is situated in Tokyo Bay and overlooks the famed Rainbow Bridge. On the other hand, the Paralympics will require only 8,000 beds.

The images of the beds that have surfaced on social media platforms indicate that they are far from luxurious, and their small size has made them the focus of jokes and trolls.

Many even joked calling these beds as "anti-sex beds" signalling that the capacity of the beds are barely sufficient for a single person.

Athletes' images revealed tiny accommodations with a single bed of barely nine square metres and doubles of 12 square metres. The fact that the athletes will have to share a room make experts reckon that it will increase the chance of transmission of the deadly contagious COVID-19 infection.

The "anti-sex beds," as they've been nicknamed, will only be adequate for a single athlete, regardless of the athletes' subjective body composition, which ranges from heavy powerlifters to footballers.

The Tokyo Olympics, which were supposed to take place in 2020, have been pushed back to this year because to the COVID-19 pandemic, which has the world on its knees. Athletes from all over the world have begun to arrive in Japan in preparation for the Tokyo Games, which will be held from July 23 to August 8.

Many Japanese residents, however, are concerned about hosting the mega sporting event since it has the potential to act as a super spreader of this deadly infectious virus, putting a strain on the East Asian Island Nation's already overloaded healthcare infrastructure.


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