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School teacher violates rules to do M.Ed course

Sentinel Digital DeskBy : Sentinel Digital Desk

  |  2 Feb 2015 12:00 AM GMT

From a Correspondent

JORHAT, February 1: While maintaining a minimum percentage of attendance (85 per cent) in M.Ed (Master of Education) regular course as a regular student under Dibrugarh University (DU) in the academic session of 2009–10, the then teacher of the Cinmora Higher Secondary School in Jorhat, Pinkumoni Tamuli, now serving as in–charge Principal of the school, achieved a feat of sorts by being present in the M.Ed classes under DU on one hand and imparting education to students back at the school situated in Cinmora in Jorhat on the other hand. Tamuli had allegedly faked her actual identity of being a teacher while taking admission into the M.Ed course which is against government rules and procedures.

Talking to The Sentinel, Inspector of Schools of Jorhat, Hiren Gogoi said, “Without taking permission from the authority concerned, no regular teacher can study as a regular or even a private candidate or whatever the case may be in any government or private educatiol institution. In the case of Pinkumoni Tamuli who was granted earned leave one after the other by the then Inspector of Schools on grounds of domestic affairs and medical grounds starting from 17.08.2009 to 29.04.2010 during which the teacher actually attended classes as revealed in the RTI disclosure from the Dibrugarh University proves the wrong technique adopted by the teacher. The basic question here is not about taking leave and attending classes but the deprivation of students back in the school on account of her continuous absence from school for which I will show cause the teacher very soon.”

Meanwhile in–charge Principal of Cinmora Higher Secondary School, Pinkumoni Tamuli who was first reluctant to reply to questions pertaining to her concealed identity as a regular teacher in the prestigious Dibrugarh University and on the issue of depriving students in her school, filly said, “I never deprived students of their classes and though I attended classes in the university, I also made it to the school once in a while every month. At the time when I took admission we were informed verbally by the university staff about only 75 per cent attendance and though the M.Ed course comprised of two semesters, it actually amounted to only about three months of active classes roughly and I took leave during that period. I don’t think I have committed any gross crime.”

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